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                              Retail in Critical Care – The Impact of COVID-2019

                              April 7th, 2020 by Devangshu Dutta

                              Oil shocks, financial market crashes, localised wars and even medical emergencies like SARS pale when compared to the speed and the scale of the mayhem created by SARS-CoV-2. In recent decades the world has become far more interconnected through travel and trade, so the viral disease – medical and economic – now spreads faster than ever. Airlines carrying business and leisure-travellers have also quickly carried the virus. Businesses benefitting from lower costs and global scale are today infected deeply due to the concentration of manufacturing and trade.

                              A common defensive action worldwide is the lock-down of cities to slow community transmission (something that, ironically, the World Health Organization was denying as late as mid-January). The Indian government implemented a full-scale 3-week national lockdown from March 25. The suddenness of this decision took most businesses by surprise, but quick action to ensure physical distancing was critical.

                              Clearly consumer businesses are hit hard. If we stay home, many “needs” disappear; among them entertainment, eating out, and buying products related to socializing. Even grocery shopping drops; when you’re not strolling through the supermarket, the attention is focussed on “needs”, not “wants”. A travel ban means no sales at airport and railway kiosks, but also no commute to the airport and station which, in turn means that the businesses that support taxi drivers’ daily needs are hit.

                              Responses vary, but cash is king! US retailers have wrangled aid and tax breaks of potentially hundreds of billions of dollars, as part of a US$2 trillion stimulus. A British retailer is filing for administration to avoid threats of legal action, and has asked landlords for a 5-month retail holiday. Several western apparel retailers are cancelling orders, even with plaintive appeals from supplier countries such as Bangladesh and India. In India, large corporate retailers are negotiating rental waivers for the lockdown period or longer. Many retailers are bloated with excess inventory and, with lost weeks of sales, have started cancelling orders with their suppliers citing “force majeure”. Marketing spends have been hit. (As an aside, will “viral marketing” ever be the same?)

                              On the upside are interesting collaborations and shifts emerging. In the USA, Jo-Ann Stores is supplying fabric and materials to be made up into masks and hospital gowns at retailer Nieman Marcus’ alteration facilities. LVMH is converting its French cosmetics factories into hand sanitizer production units for hospitals, and American distilleries are giving away their alcohol-based solutions. In India, hospitality groups are providing quarantine facilities at their empty hotels. Zomato and Swiggy are partnering to deliver orders booked by both online and offline retailers, who are also partnering between themselves, in an unprecedented wave of coopetition. Ecommerce and home delivery models are getting a totally unexpected boost due to quarantine conditions.

                              Life-after-lockdown won’t go back to “normal”. People will remain concerned about physical exposure and are unlikely to want to spend long periods of time in crowds, so entertainment venues and restaurants will suffer for several weeks or months even after restrictions are lifted, as will malls and large-format stores where families can spend long periods of time.

                              The second major concern will be income-insecurity for a large portion of the consuming population. The frequency and value of discretionary purchases – offline and online – will remain subdued for months including entertainment, eating-out and ordering-in, fashion, home and lifestyle products, electronics and durables.

                              The saving grace is that for a large portion of India, the Dusshera-Deepavali season and weddings provide a huge boost, and that could still float some boats in the second half of this year. Health and wellness related products and services would also benefit, at least in the short term. So 2020 may not be a complete washout.

                              So, what now?

                              Retailers and suppliers both need to start seriously questioning whether they are valuable to their customer or a replaceable commodity, and crystallise the value proposition: what is it that the customer values, and why? Business expansion, rationalised in 2009-10, had also started going haywire recently. It is again time to focus on product line viability and store productivity, and be clear-minded about the units to be retained.

                              Someone once said, never let a good crisis be wasted.

                              This is a historical turning point. It should be a time of reflection, reinvention, rejuvenation. It would be a shame if we fail to use it to create new life-patterns, social constructs, business models and economic paradigms.

                              (This article was published in the Financial Express under the headline “As Consumer businesses take a hard hit, time for retailers to reflect and reinvent”.?

                              Posted in Apparel, Branding, Consumer, Customer Relationship, e-commerce, Entrepreneurship, Food & Grocery, Food Service / Restaurants, Footwear, Health & Wellness, India, Lifestyle & Fashion, Luxury, Market Research, Marketing, Product Development and Design, Real Estate, Retail, Soft Goods, Strategy, Supply Chain, Technology, Textiles, Uncategorized | No Comments »

                              Patanjali – from Yoga to Noodles (Video)

                              May 7th, 2016 by admin

                              Third Eyesight’s CEO, Devangshu Dutta recently participated in a discussion about the phenomenal growth of the Patanjali brand, from yoga lessons to a food and FMCG conglomerate taking well-established multinational and Indian competitors head-on. In a conversation with Zee Business anchor, P. Karunya Rao and FCB-Ulka’s chairman Rohit Ohri, Devangshu shared his thoughts on the factors playing to Patanjali’s advantage. Excerpts from the conversation were telecast on Brandstand on Zee Business:

                              Posted in Branding, Consumer, Entrepreneurship, Food & Grocery, India, Marketing, Product Development and Design, Retail, Strategy, Supply Chain, Uncategorized, VIDEO | No Comments »

                              Hyperlocals, Aggregators: Developing the Ecosystem

                              January 21st, 2016 by Devangshu Dutta

                              Aggregator models and hyperlocal delivery, in theory, have some significant advantages over existing business models.

                              Unlike an inventory-based model, aggregation is asset-light, allowing rapid building of critical mass. A start-up can tap into existing infrastructure, as a bridge between existing retailers and the consumer. By tapping into fleeting consumption opportunities, the aggregator can actually drive new demand to the retailer in the short term.

                              A hyperlocal delivery business can concentrate on understanding the nuances of a customer group in a small geographic area and spend its management and financial resources to develop a viable presence more intensively.

                              However, both business models are typically constrained for margins, especially in categories such as food and grocery. As volume builds up, it’s feasible for the aggregator to transition at least part if not the entire business to an inventory-based model for improved fulfilment and better margins. By doing so the aggregator would, therefore, transition itself to being the retailer.

                              Customer acquisition has become very expensive over the last couple of years, with marketplaces and online retailers having driven up advertising costs – on top of that, customer stickiness is very low, which means that the platform has to spend similar amounts of money to re-acquire a large chunk of customers for each transaction.

                              The aggregator model also needs intensive recruitment of supply-side relationships. A key metric for an aggregator’s success is the number of local merchants it can mobilise quickly. After the initial intensive recruitment the merchants need to be equipped to use the platform optimally and also need to be able to handle the demand generated.

                              Most importantly, the acquisitions on both sides – merchants and customers – need to move in step as they are mutually-reinforcing. If done well, this can provide a higher stickiness with the consumer, which is a significant success outcome.

                              For all the attention paid to the entry and expansion of multinational retailers and nationwide ecommerce growth, retail remains predominantly a local activity. The differences among customers based on where they live or are located currently and the immediacy of their needs continue to drive diversity of shopping habits and the unpredictability of demand. Services and information based products may be delivered remotely, but with physical products local retailers do still have a better chance of servicing the consumer.

                              What has been missing on the part of local vendors is the ability to use web technologies to provide access to their customers at a time and in a way that is convenient for the customers. Also, importantly, their visibility and the ability to attract customer footfall has been negatively affected by ecommerce in the last 2 years. With penetration of mobile internet across a variety of income segments, conditions are today far more conducive for highly localised and aggregation-oriented services. So a hyperlocal platform that focusses on creating better visibility for small businesses, and connecting them with customers who have a need for their products and services, is an opportunity that is begging to be addressed.

                              It is likely that each locality will end up having two strong players: a market leader and a follower. For a hyperlocal to fit into either role, it is critical to rapidly create viability in each location it targets, and – in order to build overall scale and continued attractiveness for investors – quickly move on to replicate the model in another location, and then another. They can become potential acquisition targets for larger ecommerce companies, which could acquire to not only take out potential competition but also to imbibe the learnings and capabilities needed to deal with demand microcosms.

                              High stake bets are being placed on this table – and some being lost with business closures – but the game is far from being played out yet.

                              Posted in Apparel, Consumer, Customer Relationship, e-commerce, Entrepreneurship, Food & Grocery, Footwear, India, Lifestyle & Fashion, Market Research, Marketing, Retail, Soft Goods, Strategy, Supply Chain, Technology, Textiles, Uncategorized | No Comments »

                              From yogasan to ayurved to noodles, the Patanjali Group’s growing momentum

                              November 17th, 2015 by Devangshu Dutta

                              The Patanjali Group has created an Indian FMCG giant in a very short span of time on the back of a three-pronged strategy:

                              1. The enormous brand awareness that can be attributed to the very high visibility of Baba Ramdev, across a variety of media and issues,
                              2. Wide and deep market penetration through a large network of outlets and distributors across the country, and
                              3. Pricing itself below the benchmark competitor in each product area in which it is competing.

                              Over time, the group has also invested in improving its manufacturing and packaging infrastructure to bring itself on par with well-established competitors.

                              The group has clearly focussed itself on the mass market, and Patanjali Group’s products become a “go-to” for customers who are more price-sensitive than brand-loyal. This definitely creates pressure on established brands in each of the product segments where the group is now present.

                              In the growing market for ready-to-cook packaged food, a new entrant would struggle to create visibility and initial demand. However, with the momentum of the Patanjali brand behind it, the group’s new product — instant noodles — has a fighting chance.

                              I must say, though, that the immediate opportunity would have been bigger had Maggi also not just relaunched in the market. The other aspect to keep in mind is that while a lot of food and nutraceutical products resonate easily with the Patanjali brand, instant noodles seem completely counter-intuitive under this brand’s umbrella. How much consumers will support this new launch remains to be seen.

                              This 2-4 minute noodles story is still cooking. Keep watching the pot!

                              Posted in Branding, Consumer, Entrepreneurship, Food & Grocery, India, Market Research, Marketing, Retail, Strategy, Supply Chain, Uncategorized | No Comments »

                              Leveraging Opportunities in Food & Beverage Sector

                              May 15th, 2014 by Tarang Gautam Saxena

                              “Ingredients for Speed & Innovation” Conference 2014 gathered together senior delegates (CEOs/ CXOs) of the food & beverage Industry, on 7 May 2014 in Delhi. The event was organised by Third Eyesight in association with Infor India Pvt. Ltd. & Nagarro Software Pvt. Ltd.

                              IMG_3240

                              Devangshu Dutta, CEO, Third Eyesight

                              The conference was focused on the emerging opportunities for the companies in food and beverage sector amidst the challenging business environment. In his opening presentation, Devangshu Dutta, CEO, Third Eyesight reflected on the current macro-economic environment and the dichotomous changes in the consumer mindset. Dutta highlighted the need for companies to invest in developing advance insights, and to not only anticipate change but to seed ideas and invest in creating industry segments. Manish Gupta, VP Business Development, Nagarro provided insights on various technological solutions that have been engaged by companies that could enable companies achieve faster and better visibility into the data.

                              IMG_3273

                              Manish Gupta, VP Business Development, Nagarro

                              A panel discussion that followed discussed industry leaders’ experiences related to challenges faced with respect to demand fluctuations, demand fragmentation, complex supply chains for products with low shelf life, lack of homogeneity in food ingredients sourced through diverse geographic locations within India, as well as high levels of personnel attrition.

                              20140507_204041

                              Devangshu Dutta, Manish Agarwal, Arshad Siddiqui, Tarang Gautam Saxena, Manish Gupta

                              Manish Agarwal, Director, Bikanervala mentioned that while consumers are including other cuisines in their diet, they still prefer to have Indian food on a regular basis. Standing firm on its positioning of being a leader in Indian traditional snacks and QSR has helped his company to sustain business in these challenging times.

                              Arshad Siddiqui of Rasna Beverages shared the challenges related to diversity in India not only of the demand base but even the supply base. He highlighted how flavours of the same fruit vary across different geographic regions within India and adds to the complexity of maintaining consistency in the product range.

                              The conference was received well by the delegates who found immense value in?exchanging thoughts on some highly relevant business issues.

                              Posted in EVENTS, Food & Grocery, India, Marketing, Retail, Strategy, Supply Chain, Uncategorized | No Comments »

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